Author: Scott T. Ciszewski

POST-ACCIDENT CHECKLIST

Being in a car accident can be a stressful experience for anyone.  The results of an accident can range from life-changing injuries with high medical bills to property damage.  Following a few of the steps below can alleviate some of the stress and put any victim into the right position to relieve some of the issues that can follow a car accident.

Call the Police:  After an accident, it is important to immediately call the police.  In doing this, a police officer will write up an official incident report if the accident occurred on public property.  If the accident occurred on private property, you can file an accident report with the appropriate local law enforcement unit. Accident reports can be filed online in many jurisdictions.  An accident report can be important in proving to the court and insurance companies who was at fault in causing the accident.  Without the accident report, obtaining a settlement for your injuries and property damage may prove difficult.

Document Information:  Write down the other driver’s license plate number, make and model of the car, name, contact information and insurance of the other driver.  Take pictures and videos of the scene.  This can all be used as evidence at a later time in the case if necessary.  If the opposing driver makes any concession as to guilt such as “I’m sorry” or “I should have been looking before I backed out” take a mental note and write it down.

Get Medical Care:  Take care of yourself.  Some people do not notice pain after an accident because they are in shock while other people think they can just work through the pain.  A sore back can lead to a multitude of problems that show up later in life, so it is important to seek medical care to check for injuries.  Medical records will document actual injuries, diagnoses and treatments that result from an accident.  Waiting to seek medical attention can raise questions about whether the injuries were related to the accident.

Call Your Insurance Provider:  A victim of a car accident should call their insurance company as soon as possible to report the accident.

Ciszewski-ScottContact An Attorney:  People often have questions after an accident and attorneys can answers those questions.  Know your rights before speaking with the other driver’s insurance company.  If you have questions or want to learn more about post-accident relief, contact the law firm of Artz, Dewhirst & Wheeler, LLP.

 

 

DISCLAIMER: Artz, Dewhirst & Wheeler, LLP presents the information on this web site as a service to Internet users, including members of the public. While the information on this site is about legal issues, it is not intended as legal advice or as a substitute for the particularized advice of an attorney. People seeking specific legal advice or assistance should contact an attorney.

A Person with a Felony Conviction May Petition Court to Restore Right to Own a Firearm

DID YOU KNOW A FELONY CONVICTION MAY NOT END THE RIGHT TO OWN A FIREARM?

Whether it’s for hunting or home protection, many people enjoy their Second Amendment right to own a firearm.  In Ohio, a state felony conviction can affect a person in many ways and one of the consequences for a felony conviction is a prohibition on a person’s right to own a firearm.

Ohio law allows someone who has been convicted of a state felony to petition the Court of Common Pleas in the jurisdiction where the person resides for reinstatement of firearm privileges.  It is within the court’s discretion as to whether to grant the petition and allow the applicant to own a firearm again or to deny the petition.  The court will base its decision on multiple factors, including; (1) if the applicant has been living a “law-abiding” life since the felony incident, (2) the applicant is not prohibited from owning a firearm for any other reason, and (3) whether the applicant has completed jail/probation time.

Although, federal law prohibits anyone who is convicted of a federal felony from possessing a firearm, federal law provides limited options for a person to regain the right to own a firearm. A person convicted of a felony may be able to (1) petition a Court of Common Pleas for reinstatement of firearm privileges or (2) file an application to expunge the felony conviction.

DISCLAIMER

Artz, Dewhirst & Wheeler, LLP presents the information on this web site as a service to Internet users, including members of the public. While the information on this site is about legal issues, it is not intended as legal advice or as a substitute for the particularized advice of an attorney. The blog post does not represent the political views of Artz, Dewhirst & Wheeler, LLP.  People seeking specific legal advice or assistance should contact an attorney.

DID YOU KNOW CERTAIN CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS CAN BE SEALED AND HIDDEN FROM THE PUBLIC?

ADVERTISING MATERIAL

Benefits of Sealing a Criminal Record

Sealing a criminal record is valuable when applying for a job or license, seeking a line of credit, applying for educational programs, obtaining housing and securing other opportunities.  Most employers and landlords are not eligible to view a sealed criminal record.

Eligibility for Sealing Records

There are eligibility requirements when seeking to seal criminal records.  In most cases, a person can have no more than two misdemeanor convictions or one misdemeanor and one felony conviction to be eligible to have a criminal record sealed.

When two or more convictions are from the same criminal act, they shall be considered one conviction under the eligibility standard.  When two or three convictions result from the same charges and result from related criminal acts that were committed within a three-month period, the court has discretion to make all the acts count as one conviction under the eligibility standard.  A person who has pending criminal charges is not eligible.  Certain types of convictions, such as OVI’s (drunk driving), can never be sealed.

A conviction of a minor misdemeanor is not considered a conviction under the eligibility standards.  Therefore, a minor misdemeanor does not count as a misdemeanor towards the eligibility requirement of sealing the records.

Time for Filing a Request to Seal Records

After a certain time frame, eligible offenders may start the process to seal their record(s).  For misdemeanor convictions: one year after a final discharge.  For felony convictions: three years after a final discharge.

Any person who is found not guilty or has had charges dismissed against them may apply to the court for an order to seal the records anytime after the finding of not guilty or the dismissal of the charge.

Sealing the record for criminal convictions in Ohio requires a relatively small investment for a potentially significant benefit.  If you wish to know more about expungements, please contact attorney Scot Ciszewski at Artz, Dewhirst & Wheeler, LLP.

DISCLAIMER

Artz, Dewhirst & Wheeler, LLP presents the information on this web site as a service to Internet users, including members of the public. While the information on this site is about legal issues, it is not intended as legal advice or as a substitute for the particularized advice of an attorney. People seeking specific legal advice or assistance should contact an attorney.